Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Artist Profile: Linda Anderson

Linda Anderson
La Mesa, California

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you?  I looked at my personal artistic history and what elements consistently showed up in my work as iconic concept images.  When I came up with those elements, which I could condense to 4 (people, places, perspective, photography),  then it was fun to think of an image that would independently represent each element for me and my work.  Surprisingly those visual symbols came easily.  I usually tell stories of other peoples and cultures.  I loved being able to tell something about my story this time around.

2. Describe your studio space?  I have a 4 1/2 foot by 6-foot table working space with a set in mid arm sewing machine in one corner of the table.  Everything gets done on this table space…. painting, cutting, drawing, all the myriad steps.  On the wall next to me are all my threads.  There is a cubby behind me with fabrics and next to it a small table with my computer.  And of course, an ironing board nearby.  This is a spare bedroom that also is my husband’s office.  I like being able to spend time together in the same room.


3. Where can people see your work in the next six months?  I have a piece at Southern Utah Museum of Art in Cedar City, Utah, till August 26 where I just won Best in Show.  I have a piece at Sacred Threads in Herndon, Virginia, until July 23. I will have a piece in the Houston Quilt Festival in Quilts: World of Beauty in November.   I have a piece touring with SAQA in Australia through November and another piece touring with SAQA in Birmingham, England, on August 10-13.  And I hope to have 1-2 pieces in Road to California next January.


4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist?  It seems all my work is consistent in representing stories of peoples and cultures, so that in essence is a ‘series in theme’ that always grabs me.  I am also working on a ‘China series’, based on photos I took on a trip there.  I intersperse working on that theme with creating other pieces that have stories I feel compelled to tell, such as an Oaxaca piece I’m working on now.  We have a trip next year to India, so I know I will be gathering more photos for an India series.


5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy?  I spend an hour each morning exercising.  After that, I’m pretty narrowly focused.  Working 6 days a week on my art feeds my creative energy.  Doing the daily work with all the myriad steps involved in how I create continually feeds me to do the next step.  I know what the end piece will look like, since I create a finished drawing at the front end of how I want it to be.  The reverse engineering needed to get to that end image is a daily challenge I love to solve.  My mind is always active.  I love waking up to do what I do. 

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Artist Profile: Gerrie Congdon

Gerrie Congdon
Portland, Oregon

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you? It took me a bit of thinking. I decided that my line dancing series embodies the work that I most love to do: creating small motifs that are then fused together to create an art quilt.
2. Describe your studio space? I share a lovely space with my daughter, Lisa Congdon. She does fine art painting there twice a week. It is a large room with high ceilings, a wall of windows and a cool concrete floor. It was once a dairy building and this is the original floor. I have a print table and cutting table and storage units for my fabric and supplies.  I do my sewing and finishing at home in what I call the multi-purpose room. I have my sewing table, storage of some supplies, printers, computer and thermofax.

3. Where can people see your work in the next six months? I don’t currently have work that will be exhibited except for this piece.

4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist? I never thought that I worked in a series. At least I was not consciously working in a series. I took a class on Working in a Series with Kathleen Probst where I analyzed my work and was able to see that I actually have 3 - 4 series. The benefit of that was realizing that one of the series was more successful and made me happier. I think it helps to focus on what you do well.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy?  I love to go to art museums and galleries. Taking walks and photographing the world around me. Taking workshops. Just hanging out with other creative friends.

Monday, August 14, 2017

Artist Profile: Heather Pregger

Heather Pregger
Houston, Texas

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you?  As an abstract quilt artist, I don't always work with a concrete theme in mind.  And, honestly, if I AM trying to convey a message it is often discernible only to me.  But I do have a symbol, or icon, that I return to again and again in my work, the tuning fork.  It has great meaning to me.  It has changed recently into something more primitive and graffiti-esque, which I felt made it a good fit for the exhibit.  It was a very interesting challenge.
2. Describe your studio space?  I work in a large, airy L-shaped room with lots of south and west facing windows.  It contains my sewing table, an ironing surface, my cutting table, my design wall and my ancient Gammill longarm machine.  And a loveseat by the west windows, where you can almost always find my cat, Boomer.  He does let me join him for naps there occaisionally.

3. Where can people see your work in the next six months?  I have a quilt in Textile Posters, a SAQA show debuting at International Quilt Festival in Houston.  I have a quilt in the IQF "World of Beauty" show.  One of my pieces is in "Live your Brightest Life", a show honoring the memory of Yvonne Porcella.  It can be seen currently at Sacred Threads.  I am in a group show with Sue Benner, Barbara Oliver Hartman and Carole Trice October 14 through November 9 at North Lake College in Irving, Texas.  



4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist?  I am working on two series right now.  One is the tuning fork series, the other is the geological series, based on sketches of microscopic mineral thin sections I drew in college.  When working on a piece, I almost always have a "what if" moment.  What if I changed this or added that -- my mind moves on to the next quilt while I'm working on it's predecessor.  I find that working this way allows me to expand and refine the series and allows me to grow as an artist.  When I run out of "what ifs", the series is finished.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy?  I love to work in the garden.  I love to walk, mostly around my neighborhood or in the Fort Worth Botanical Garden.  I love to travel.  I love to read.  I love to paint in watercolor.  I'm not very good at it, but I love it!
 

Friday, August 11, 2017

Artist Profile: Jeannie P. Moore

Jeannie P. Moore
Escondido, California

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you? This theme gave me a multitude of ideas and it was hard for me to focus and choose just one design. I started designing and working on one concept and put that aside. I then began another quilt which is this one but didn’t finish it before I almost went back with my first design!
2. Describe your studio space? I work in 2 rooms in my home in San Diego. My sewing room consists of my Bernina longarm and my Bernina Quilters Edition. My workroom has 2 large tables for cutting and ironing and a design wall. I have a small courtyard off my studio room for dyeing fabric. Hopefully the future will bring me a larger studio space!?
3. Where can people see your work in the next six months? I have a quilt in Textile Architecture at IQF Houston, 3 quilts are traveling with SAQA’s Concrete & Grasslands, Radical Elements and Food for Thought.
4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist? I have a Roundabout Series which I enjoyed and would like to do another similar one. Once your design/concept is established I think the series comes quickly. Thanks for the idea!

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy? I love to cook and don’t necessarily like following recipes. I like creating a meal with what I have on hand and especially with seasonal vegetables and fruits. I’ve recently taken up knitting and love all of the dyed yarns!

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Artist Profile: Rachel King Parris

Rachel King Parris
Birmingham, Alabama

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you? Choosing an icon, design, finding the perfect fabric
2. Describe your studio space?  Large enclosed area in the back of the garage about 400 square feet. tile floor, huge design wall, large cutting/pressing table, sewing table, utility sink, small sitting area. Gift from my man.
3. Where can people see your work in the next six months?  Dinner@8 exhibit at the International Quilt Festival in Houston
4. Do you ever work in a series? I never have, but intend to try.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy?  I write, read voraciously, visit museums, enjoy digital photography, get outdoors, read friends’ blogs, visit beautiful places.

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Artist Profile: Virginia Spiegel

Virginia Spiegel
Elgin, Illinois

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you? I had an artwork ready to be submitted for jurying WAY in advance, but then it was chosen as a cover for a magazine. I was working on several other artworks using the canoe motif and extensive surface design so I didn’t need to agonize (again) on how I wanted to create “Boundary Waters 88.” It WAS difficult to be mindful of the 40x40 inch size after creating several very large artworks.

2. Describe your studio space? It’s a happy place filled with inspiring photos, artworks, and a lot of fabric created by me.

3. Where can people see your work in the next six months? Now – September 19, “H2OH!,” National Quilt Museum, Paducah, KY;  Aug. 10 through 2018, “My Corner of the World,” Various locations in Australia;  Aug. 11 – Oct. 22, “EDGE: On the Verge”, Alice C. Sabatini Gallery, Topeka, KS;  Now throughout 2017, “2x20”, Original Sewing & Quilt Expos; Sept. 22 – 24, “Concrete and Grasslands,” 9th Asia Quilt Festival, Shanghai, China.

4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist?I love working in series.  I never grow bored of creating new ways to share with others the beauty of the natural world. I’m ever hopeful that we will come to treasure our precious natural environment, rather than mindlessly exploit it for profit.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy? Painting, gardening (both veg and landscape), walking, traveling. 

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Artist Profile: Susan Brubaker Knapp

Susan Brubaker Knapp
Mooresville, North Carolina

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you? This theme was more difficult for me than usual. I think it was because it took my brain in so many different directions at once… There was the “personal iconography” component and the “graffiti” component. How to marry them together in a unified piece? What WAS my personal iconography, anyway? I considered making it look like those Russian religious icon paintings, framed in gold, and rich in symbolism. Did the word “graffiti” mean that it needed to have a graffiti look to it? I researched graffiti and found a wide range of styles. I chewed over the theme for a very long time before deciding to work on a portrait of my daughter. I don’t usually do faces, so I sweated a great deal about executing the face and stitching it. 

2. Describe your studio space? My studio is in a former guest room in our home, and it’s about 14’ x 14’. I have a two large windows, a raised work table for cutting and painting, a sewing cabinet with my Bernina machine, a large design wall, and way too much stuff. I yearn for a bigger, more organized space, and especially one where I can get really messy.

3. Where can people see your work in the next six months? I'll have pieces in the “World of Beauty” exhibition and the Dinner @ Eight Artists exhibition at International Quilt Festival in Houston this fall, and a piece in the “Threads of Resistance” exhibition that will be traveling the country through 2018.
4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist? I love working in series (I was on a butterfly kick a while back, and now I’m obsessed with fish!), but I also find it to be constraining. My biggest problem is that I have so many ideas that I will never have time to work on them all unless I become a vampire and can live eternally. 

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy? Pretty much everything I do feeds my creativity. (Today I went to a medical appointment and came up with 10 new ideas for art quilts.) My favorite hobbies – geneaology, drawing, photography, cooking – all play a big role. My morning walks are a major source of material. 

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